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Overview

Managing Requirements change is critical for successful project delivery. Failure to do so is one of the key factors contributing to project failure. No matter what plan and processes are in place for change management, it is essential to use a tool that assists with tracking changes, analyzing the impact of the changes to the solution design, and managing the change process end-to-end.

Enterprise Architect supports Change Management Processes with the automated tracking and management of requirements changes end-to-end. The inherent ability of the tool to visually represent changes to solution design artifacts means there is effective impact analysis. Enterprise Architect's Formal Review allows systemic and controlled collaboration on any review item by multiple reviewers.

In this webinar, you will learn how Enterprise Architect enables managing Requirements changes:

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Session 1

Melbourne Thu 04 Feb 19:00 pm
New York Thu 04 Feb 03:00 am
Los Angeles Thu 04 Feb 00:00 am
Singapore Thu 04 Feb 16:00 pm
London Thu 04 Feb 08:00 am

Session 2

Presenters

Nithiya Krishnan, CBAP® Business Solutions Architect
Sparx Systems
Professional profileNithiya is a Certified Business Analysis Practitioner, with specialized skills in solutions for Business Analysis, Business Data Modeling, Business Intelligence and Information Architecture. She has experience in all phases of IT projects in a variety of industries with niche skill in Sparx Enterprise Architect.
Scott HebbardCommunications Manager
Sparx Systems

Explore the webinar resources

Questions & Answers

Enterprise Architect has a sophisticated and flexible documentation engine that helps you to create and disseminate high quality documentation directly from the model, in document or web page format.

For more information on publishing web reports please visit:
HTML Reports
Yes, an item type can be changed. There are two ways.
a) Select the element. Go to the menu Design > Element > Manage > Change Type. From the element type window select the appropriate type, for this particular scenario – change type to Issue.
b) In the properties window of the element, click the Ellipse button for type field and set the appropriate type.
There are six types of Maintenance Items. You can create records for are each of the items listed on a separate tab of the Maintenance window:
  • Defects - each recording a failure to meet a requirement for the current model element
  • Changes - each recording a change in requirement for the current model element
  • Issues - each recording a risk factor that might affect the project, associated with the current model element
  • Tasks - each recording work in progress and work outstanding for the current model element
  • Features - each recording a feature in requirement for the current model element
  • Documents - each recording the supporting documentation such as Help, release notes and user comments
There is also an 'Overview' tab that displays a read-only list of all the Maintenance items on the element, grouped by type. If you double-click on an item in this list, the appropriate tab displays with the item highlighted. To access the maintenance window follow the menu:
    Construct
  • > Change Management and:
  • > Features > Show Features Window
  • > Changes > Show Changes Window
  • > Documents > Show Documents Window
  • > Issues > Show Issues Window
  • > Tasks > Show Tasks Window
  • > Defects > Show Defects Window
For more information on Maintenance items, please visit: Working on Maintenance Items
It is advised to set a change governance process as suggested in the webinar. Once a change is implemented, the person that implemented the change may set the status to Implemented. In an element 'Properties' definition, the status of the element in the requirements management process is defined in the element 'Status' field. You can select the appropriate value from a drop-down list, which initially contains the system values:
  • Approved
  • Implemented
  • Mandatory
  • Proposed and
  • Validated
You can add to or replace any of these values with your own custom values. You can also assign a color band to each status type, and define the types of element that can display those colors.

For more information on Requirement Color Status, please visit: Color Coded Requirements Status
Yes. All elements in Enterprise Architect may be extended to capture additional properties like the change owner, change reviewer etc., using Tagged Values. Using UML profiles, which is a light weight extension mechanism, users can create tagged values applicable for particular element types. Tagged Values in profiled objects are an excellent way to further extend the versatility of your modeling.

For more information on Tagged Value types, please visit: Tagged Value Types
Yes. All elements in Enterprise Architect may be extended to capture additional properties using Tagged Values. Using UML profiles, which is a light weight extension mechanism, users can create tagged values applicable for particular element types. Tagged Values in profiled objects are an excellent way to further extend the versatility of your modeling.
Yes. Using the Personal Tasks view, each team member can record, review and manage their personal work within the project.

For more information on the Project Calendar, please visit: Calendar
For more details on Deadlines and Task Management: Task Management
Yes. You can use the Calendar, Gantt Charts and Tagged Values. All elements in Enterprise Architect may be extended to capture additional properties like Due Date using Tagged Values. Using UML profiles, which is a light weight extension mechanism, users can create tagged values applicable for particular element types. Tagged Values in profiled objects are an excellent way to further extend the versatility of your modeling.
Yes. Using the test window for the change element, the change can be tested against scenarios and user acceptance criteria. This is a useful feature for peer reviews and to capture review results. Additionally using Formal Review elements in Enterprise Architect allows for enhanced collaboration during review. A Review element is a simple yet powerful mechanism for capturing, in real time, discussions concerned with a particular event on one or more elements and/or diagrams.

For more details please visit: Formal Review Elements
Yes, it is possible to configure notifications using MDG technology and using WebEA.

For more details please visit: Add an Issue Notification
The notifications can be configured to be shown to user groups/users depending on your individual needs.
Yes. Every Enterprise Architect element has a GUID which is a unique reference ID for the element in the underlying database. Additionally Enterprise Architect can be configured to automatically generate names with counters that helps regulate and enforce a naming standard. his is a useful feature when dealing with complex and large sets of requirements, but is also relevant when dealing with smaller data sets. Auto Names and Counters can be used to assign a sequential number to any element type including Requirements. It includes a prefix definition, a counter and a suffix definition allowing numbers such as: 'REQ007 - Manage Inventory' to be created.

For more details please visit: Set Auto Naming and Auto Counters
Enterprise Architect allows third party tools integration via Pro Cloud Server. The extensions are developed using OSLC RESTful API enabling integration of Enterprise Architect mode repository into other platforms.

Developers are invited to contact Sparx Systems Support to receive API documentation.
Yes. Every copy of Enterprise Architect ships with the EA Example model. The EA Example Model was used throughout the webinar and can easily be accessed from the Help Menu within Enterprise Architect.
Yes, Enterprise Architect support reverse engineering of code.

For more details on Reverse Engineering please visit: Developer Code Engineering
It is hard for us to answer this question because we have no point of reference or know anything about your environment. However as a general rule PostgreSQL based repositories can easily handle thousands of diagrams within a single Enterprise Architect repository, assuming the Enterprise Architect clients have a high speed (LAN based) connection to the PostgreSQL database. Usually the biggest impact on performance is how quickly data from database can be returned to back to Enterprise Architect, which is mostly determined by the underlying network and network infrastructure.
Enterprise Architect repositories are very simple databases and don't impose any limitations themselves, therefore your best source to determine the limitations of a DBMS is the authors of the various DBMS products, ie Microsoft for SQLServer, Oracle for Oracle and MySQL etc.

Generally speaking performance degrades as more data is added to a database. In the case of when Auditing is turned on, Enterprise Architect needs to perform more work (it must capture, compare and record both the before and after results of every record update), these results are then stored with the use of additional database calls. To the end user this results in slower performance, how much is hard to answer because it is different for every environment and depends on many factors like: the load on the database server (how quickly it can retrieve data), speed of the network (how quickly the data can be returned to Enterprise Architect), how many users etc.,
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